Viola

Last Chants for a Slow Dance

goddamndraculablack:

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An Autumn Afternoon (Yasujiro Ozu, 1962)

A Touch of Sin

Slow Moves

The Immigrant (James Gray, 2013)

reveriecinemaverite:

Toni (Jean Renoir, 1935)

sovietmontage:

73 Suspect Words (Peggy Ahwesh, 2000)

sovietmontage:

73 Suspect Words (Peggy Ahwesh, 2000)

Eadweard Muybridge, Zoopraxographer (Thom Andersen, 1975)

"But in Muybridge’s work photography and its passage to cinema overcame a philosophical obstacle. The modern motion picture camera bisects human time into equal moments of light and darkness, their duration regulated by the constant rotation of the shutter. Between each frame, when the shutter closes over the lens as the strip of film is repositioned, there is a moment of darkness - a fragment of time which is not recorded. Time, like any continuous quantity, is infinitely divisible; it cannot be reconstituted in its unity by a mechanical instrument which bisects it finitely. So we might question the possibility of cinema, asking: how can we recapture motion in a finite number of still pictures? Just as Zeno asked: how can we cross space in a finite number of movements since it is infinitely divisible? The solution to this paradox lies in the persistence of vision, metaphorically described in the 15th century by Leonardo da Vinci. "Every body that moves rapidly seems to colour its path with the impression of its hue. Thus when lightning moves among dark clouds the speed of its sinuous flight makes its whole course resemble a luminous snake. This is because the organ of perception acts more rapidly than the judgement." Through the persistence of vision human perception is able to bridge the darkness which always alternates coequally with the light on every motion picture screen."

Eadweard Muybridge, Zoopraxographer (Thom Andersen, 1975)

"The white cross lines formed a network of regular coordinates making it possible to plot the movements superimposed on them in the photographs. But the grid has another effect: because it is the most inert, inorganic mode of delineating space, the rectangular grid provides the most dramatic means of establishing the separateness of human beings from the physical objects surrounding them."